Antique 1920s Articulated Human Left Half Hip To Foot Bones Structure

Antique 1920s Articulated Human Left Half Hip To Foot Bones Structure

Code: 12089

SOLD

For sale is a Antique 1920s articulated medical Left half a hip to foot articulated bone structure. All bones are complete and present. One of the fascinating aspects of this skeleton is that there are two healed breaks one in the tibia and one in the heal. This is a great medical specimen, and a great one to learn from! 

 

From the Victorian era there was high demand for human bodies for medical research and teaching particularly in universities and hospitals and contrary to popular belief, not all were sourced ethically.

What medical science has learned from the use of these bodies is invaluable.

Companies such as Adam, Rouilly & Co., founded in 1920, supplied articulated skeletons to Medical Schools and Teaching Hospitals.

Natural bone was required by medical students so that they could closely examine the markings and surface anatomy of individual bones.

As technology advanced and model skeletons became more popular universities and hospitals have been selling their real human skeletons in order to raise money for more modern and practical teaching aids other means. 

Some simple rules should be followed for owning human bones.

The Human Tissue Authority (HTA) considers that the need to maintain dignity and respect is paramount in the handling of all human bodies and tissue.

You can only own human bones without a licence if they are strictly for your personal collection and stored as part of your personal collection and not on public display (photographs, adverts, internet sites and Facebook is not classed as ‘public display’)

Because the skulls & bones contain human cells they fall into the category of ‘relevant material’ within the Human Tissue Act and the following rules should be followed: 

Human skulls and bones should be treated with dignity & respect. They should never be put on public display without the appropriate licence and should never be used for transplantation purposes or for any of the scheduled purposes listed by the Human Tissue Authority (for example research, post mortem, anatomical examination, teaching or public display)

If in doubt, we would advise any potential buyer of human bones to contact the Human Tissue Authority through their website at:

https://www.hta.gov.uk

Please see the below statements taken from emails to Bull & Haynes from a Regulation Manager at the Human Tissue Authority (HTA) That may be of interest.

“It is only an offence to sell human material removed from a human body for the purpose of transplantation. For example, in the UK,  it is illegal to buy a kidney for transplantation. The law does not make it illegal to sell of bodies, body parts or tissue for other purposes.”

“Anatomical examination is for purposes of teaching or studying, or researching into, the gross structure of the human body. This is a scheduled purpose and anyone storing material for this purpose would need to be licensed. Anatomical examination is carried out at many medical schools throughout the UK where bodies are donated and dissected.

Education or training relating to human health describes the education or training of healthcare professionals, such as those learning surgical techniques. This is also a scheduled purpose and anyone storing material for this purpose would need to be licensed. Universities, colleges and hospitals using material for this purpose are licensed however human material used for teaching biology in schools is not licensable.”

“We would advise that anyone directly involved in the sale or purchase of human material should ensure that they are aware of the consent and licensing provisions of the HT Act and should make potential purchasers aware of these provisions also. In particular I would bring to the buyers attention the requirements of a HTA licence if the bones were to be displayed for the public.

The Gov website contains helpful information on the HT Act, including the HTA’s policy on the sale of human bodies, body parts and tissue. Please follow this link.

The HTA considers that the need to maintain dignity and respect is paramount in the handling of all human bodies and tissue”