WW1 German Nord-deutscher Lloyd D. Kaiser Wilhelm II Cap Tally

WW1 German Nord-deutscher Lloyd D. Kaiser Wilhelm II Cap Tally

Code: 18304

SOLD

For sale is a WW1 German Nord-deutscher Lloyd D. Kaiser Wilhelm II Cap Tally, which is in excellent condition. 

 
Norddeutscher Lloyd (NDL; lit. North German Lloyd) was a German shipping company. It was founded by Hermann Henrich Meier and Eduard Crüsemann in Bremen on 20 February 1857. It developed into one of the most important German shipping companies of the late 19th and early 20th centuries, and was instrumental in the economic development of Bremen and Bremerhaven. 
 
The SS Kaiser Wilhelm II was a 19,361 gross register ton passenger ship built at Stettin, Germany. The ship was completed in the spring of 1903. At the time of her launch she was larger by 1,900 tons than any other German ship and was surpassed in the weight of her hull and machinery only by the British liners RMS Cedric and RMS Celtic. The ship was seized by the U.S. Government during World War I, and subsequently served as a transport ship under the name USS Agamemnon. A famous photograph taken by Alfred Stieglitz called The Steerage, as well as descriptions of the conditions of travel in the lowest class, have conflicted with her otherwise glitzy reputation as a high class, high speed transatlantic liner. The ship is well-known as the vessel which took Gustav Mahler on his last trip to the United States in October 1910, as well as Jean Sibelius to the States to conduct the premiere of his tone poem The Oceanides in May 1914.
 
On 17 June 1914 Kaiser Wilhelm II collided with the 3,000-ton British steamer Incemore in thick fog off the Needles. Kaiser's hull was holed below the waterline, but the ship's watertight bulkheads held and the ship returned to Southampton under her own power. Kaiser Wilhelm II was west-bound when war with Britain began on 4 August 1914 and, after evading patrolling British cruisers, arrived at New York two days later.
 
She was seized by the U.S. Government when it declared war on Germany on 6 April 1917, and work soon began to repair her machinery, sabotaged earlier by a German caretaker crew, and otherwise prepare the ship for use as a transport. While this work progressed, she was employed as a barracks ship at the New York Navy Yard.
 
The U.S. Navy placed the ship in commission as USS Kaiser Wilhelm II (ID-3004) in late August 1917. Her name was changed to Agamemnon at the beginning of September and active war work commenced at the end of October, when she left for her first troopship voyage to France. While at sea on 9 November 1917, she was damaged in a collision with another large ex-German transport, USS Von Steuben, but delivered her passengers to the war zone a few days later. Following her return to the U.S. in December and subsequent repair work, Agamemnon again steamed to France in mid-January 1918 and thereafter regularly crossed the Atlantic as part of the effort to establish a major American military presence on the Western Front. The routine was occasionally punctuated by encounters with real or suspected U-boats and, during the autumn of 1918, with outbreaks of influenza on board.
 
This will be sent via Royal Mail 1st class signed for and dispatched within two working days.