WW2 British 13 Year Girl London Evacuee To Brighton Paperwork Grouping

WW2 British 13 Year Girl London Evacuee To Brighton Paperwork Grouping

Code: 12689

£185.00 Approx $228.11, €218.42, £185
(1 in stock)
 
For sale is a WW2 British London Evacuee Paperwork Grouping to a 13 Year Old Girl Called Sheila Fenn.
 
The evacuee is called Shelia Mary Fenn, farther Ernest Jesse Fenna, in which in 1938 to the end of the war the parents of Shelia lived; 62 Cornhill, London EC3V3NH, with the occupation of Bank Housekeeper Messenger. Sheila shortly before the start of the war attended the grey coat hospital school via a scholarship that was awarded to her. However in 1939 she was made an evacuee and sent from London to Brighton, in which she attended Varndeen school for girls Brighton. There are many interesting letters between teachers, evacuees and parents talking about all of the new experiences their children are having whilst in “forced exile” as one of the teachers had put it, experiences like visiting devils dyke on a field trip, tending to animals, new classes and workshops like shoe repairing etc, and that there had even been a few cases of the German measles during the cold winter of 1940. This grouping gives you an incredible insight into the daily lives of evacuees from London to Brighton during the Blitz in wartime Britain! 
 
During World War II, the grey coat hospital was evacuated twice, first to Brighton than to Farnham, Surrey. While unoccupied, the old seventeenth-century building was almost destroyed during an air raid on the night of 10–11 May 1941. After the war, the school continued in temporary accommodation while rebuilding took place.
 
Also by taking a look at the blitz records for London in 1941 her home address where her parents lived was bombed twice By a High-Explosive-Bomb,Source: Aggregate Night Time Bomb-Census 7th October 1940 to 6 June 1941 Fell between Oct. 7, 1940 and June 6, 1941 in which it’s Present-day address White Lion Court, City of London, EC3V 3NH, City of London. This can be seen in the final photograph. 
 
 
In this grouping of 20 documents, there are official documents, hand written letters from the evacuee etc. 
 
 
Starting this grouping is government document titled: 
 
“GOVERNMENT EVACUATION SCHEME 
 
TO PARENTS OF THE CHILDREN WHO HAVE BEEN MOVED TO THE COUNTRY, WITH THEIR SCHOOLS, UNDER THE GOVERNMENT SCHEME.
MINISTRY OF HEALTH
 
October, 1939. Dear sir or madam , as you know, the Government have made arrangements under very large number of children have moved out of the crowded or their greater safety from air attack. The children are being with board and lodging, and arrangements have also been For their medical attendance. The cost of the scheme since its beginning has been borne entirely lic funds, but I am sure that no parent would wish this to continue tely where it can be avoided. Accordingly a scheme has been up by which parents will be asked to make a reasonable payment is the cost of keeping their children who are away from home, been decided that liability for payments should not begin before October, and that no request for payment should be made for the since evacuation began up to that date. The cost to public funds of the maintenance of each child who has away is on average about 9s. per week. Many parents will be and willing to pay this amount, and I ask them to do so. The nment recognises, however, that the saving of expense to families ping children away from home is in many cases considerably less his sum, and that in the case of many families with small incomes d not be fair to make such a request. ccordingly the Government have decided to fix 6s. a week for a child as a sum which would be accepted as full discharge of this . Furthermore, they are making arrangements whereby those who ow that such a sum would be an unreasonable burden upon them a reduced sum according to their circumstances. has been arranged that the Local Authorities will act in this matter nts for the Government, as you will see from the accompanying letter from your Council. should be very grateful if you would give this your most careful consideration. I am confident that in the great task which lies before us rely upon your co-operation and goodwill. Yours sincerely, Minister of Health.”
 
 
Next letter dated December 1938 is from London country council list of Girls secondary schools maintained or aided by the council- the name of the head mistress is underlined. This letter is double sided.
 
Another letter dated 1938 is titled the grey coat hospital clothes list, next to all the items of clothing that a school girl needs is the different clothing sizes and little x’s next to all the items of clothing needed for Sheila the evacuees. 
 
 
Another letter from London county council undertaking to be signed by parents of pupils holding special places in secondary school; letter application is filled out for Sheila Mary Fenn, dated 10th March 1939, for the address of 62 Cornhill London EC3. 
 
 
Another letter from London county council which states; “ dear sir or madam, dental certificate with reference to the medical examination of your child Sheila in 3.4.1939 I have to remind you that the certificate which should have reached this office by 20.5.1939 has not yet been received. Please arrange for this certificate to be forwarded and to reach this office by 24.04.1939 yours faithfully Frederick menzines, school medical officer”. 
 
Another letter from London country council dated 7th July 1939. This letter states: Dear Madam, Special places in secondary schools. Sheila Tenn. The award of a special place to your child has now been confirmed and he- (she) is authorised to commence attendenee as from 133.39 atGrey Coat Hospital School. The special place is tenable in accordance with the Council's existing regulations and any modifications thereof in force from time to time and the conditions of tenure will be liable to variation as indicated in the regulations already sent to you. In view of the amount of your income for the financial year ended 31st March, 1938, the award will consist of: - Free tuition and the use of books. The birth certificate is returned herewith. You will be interested to learn that in London scholarships are awarded to pupils at various stages of their educational career, which provide maintenance grants in addition to free tuition. Particulars of the scholarships are set out in the Scholarship Handbook, which is published yearly and which can be obtained from Messrs. P. S. King & Son, Ltd., 14, Great Smith Street, Westminster, S.W.1, price 3d. by post 5d. Yours faithfully, E. M. RICH education officer”. 
 
Another letter from London county council titled special places in secondary schools Sheila Fenn dated 7th July 1939 states: “The award of a special place to your child has now been confirmed and-he- (she) is authorised to commence attendenee as from 133.29 at Grey Coat Hospital School. The special place is tenable in accordance with the Council's existing regulations and any modifications thereof in force from time to time and the conditions of tenure will be liable to variation as indicated in the regulations already sent to you. In view of the amount of your income for the financial year ended 31st March, 1938, the award will consist of: - Free tuition and the use of books. The birth certificate is returned herewith. You will be interested to learn that in London scholarships are awarded to pupils at various stages of their educational career, which provide maintenance grants in addition to free tuition. Particulars of the scholarships are set out in the Scholarship Handbook, which is published yearly and which can be obtained from Messrs. P. S. King & Son, Ltd., 14, Great Smith Street, Westminster, S.W.1, price 3d. by post 5d. Yours faithfully, E. M. RICH”
 
The next letter is where it becomes a little more interesting, this letter gives us insite into an evacuees daily lives, into their pocket money, curfews etc. The letter is from grey coat hospital Westminster SW1 at Varndeen school for girls Brighton,6. Dated 28th September 1939, sent to mrs Fenn, the letter states: “I expect that you will have heard from your daughter that we have now begun a regular time-table. We are very fortunate to be able to use the Varndean School in alterate sessions with the Brighton girls, and the children are settling down and getting on with their ordinary work. We are keeping continual supervision on their billets, but I think it would be advisable, and much appreciated, for you to get into touch with their Brighton hostesses if you have not already done so. I expect you will have realised that the children will naturally need money for various expenses as they do in London - such as: Pocket money (a little), to include their usual subscription to Westminster Hospital. 1/6 Games subscription (not for L.C.C. scholars or Special Place holders) Needle work and Domestic Science money Money for Art materials Bus fares, when necessary Stamps, shoe repairs, hair cutting and hair washing, if necessary Milk, if they wish to have it, at a cost of 3d. per week Hot dinners, when necessary, at a cost of 9d, a day. If you feel that the children cannot manage to look after their money themselves, it can be sent to the Form Mistress, who will act as a Bank, and give it to them as they require it. We are insisting on all children keeping in their school uniform; in a town like this we feel it is a real protection to them, as well as enabling us to keep a better check on them. We are also having a curfew, at present at 7.30 p.m., by which time they must be indoors - this hour will get earlier as winter comes on. I hope that when you write to your daughter, you will stress your approval of these regulations. Should you wish to consult me, I can see you by Appointment, during the week at Varndean School for Girls, Balfour Road, and if absolutely necessary, during the week-end at 57, Beaconsfield Villas. During the week-end one of the Staff can always be seen at 22 Beaconsfield Villas, from 2.30 to 4.30 on Saturday, and 10.30 to 12.30, and 2.30 to 4.30 on Sunday. You may be assured that we will do our best to look after the children as long as they are separated from you, but we will continue to hope that more normal times in Westminster will soon be restored. Yours very truly, D 7. Chetham - Stride”
 
The next piece of paperwork titled “the royal foundation of the grey coat hospital Westminster report for the autumn term 1939” where it states Sheila is currently 13.6 years old, she was late twice, absent 0 times, and held a B+ on average through her work. Some of her subjects and grades included an A- in old testimony scripture, New Testament prayer book, English B, History B+, Georgraphy B+, Latin A-, French A-, mathematics B+, Biology B, Domestic subjects C, Art A-, Physical education B.
 
The next three document dated 16th October 1939 (standard typed letter) and the 26th October 1939 (filled in previous letter) and 31st January 1940 (filled in first letter) from London county council college recover of expenses branch states “GOVERNMENT EVACUATION SCHEME. Repayment of Billeting Charges. I enclose a letter addressed by the Minister of Health to the parents of children who have been removed with their schools to places of greater safety under the Government Evacuation Scheme. You will see from this letter that the Government are asking parents to pay what they can afford towards the cost of the maintenance of these children, and the Government have directed this Council to act as their agents for the collection of the money due from parents in the County of London in accordance with a basis of assessment decided upon by the Government. Please fill in and return to me within the next 3 days the form enclosed with this letter. An addressed envelope (which need not be stamped) is enclosed for this purpose. If you can pay the full cost (9/- a week) or at least 6/- a week in respect of each child, you need not fill in Parts 2 and 3 of the form. If, however, you cannot afford to pay 6/- a week for each child, please fill in the whole form and you will be informed whether your offer can be accepted or, if not, of the amount which you will be required to pay. Yours faithfully, G. D. R. BUTLER”. 
 
 
The next letter follows similar themes to the past three of London county council repayment of billeting charges collection of distributions dated 18th November 1939. This notice states: “Collection of contribution. As from and including Saturday, 18th November, 1939, parents may pay their contributions IN CASH in respect of bilieting charges as under: SATURDAYS from 9.30 a.m. to 11 a.m. GLENGALL SCHOOL, GLENGALL GROVE, E.14. ST. GEORGE-in-the-EAST CENTRAL SCHOOL, CABLE STREET, E.1. MONDAYS from 10 a.m. to 12.30 p.m. HARLEY COLLEGE RELIEF STATION, BOW ROAD, E.3. UP PER NORTH STREET RELIEF STATION, UPPER NORTH STREET, E.14, Payments may be made by post or personally at the AREA OFFICE, BANCROFT ROAD, E.1 - MONDAYS to FRIDAYS between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m, between 10 a.m. and 12 noon. SATURDAYS CONTRIBUTIONS BY POST MUST BE SENT ONLY TO THE AREA OFFICE”.
 
The next letter brings the reality of the evacuation to light, a typed letter followed by a hand written letter from the evacuee on the reverse of this. The front letter from Grey Coat Hospital At Varndean school for girls Brighton 6, to Mrs Fenn dated 24th February 1940 states: “Various enquiries have been received about the Easter holidays, and I think you may like to know the position. break up late in the afternoon of Wednesday, March 20th, and shall begin lessons again on April 11th. In the interests of safety, the Government are urging parents very strongly not to have their children back to London; I, too, feel that this is most necessary, and I hope that, if you want your daughter to be away from Brighton, you will be able to make arrangements for her to go to the country. For those children who remain in Brighton, we shall again be able to use this school as a social centre for the whole holiday, and games, expeditions, etc. will be arranged. I must receive applications for Easter leave, in writing, from parents not later than March 8th, and I should be glad to know what plans you are able to make for your daughter. As leave from Brighton may endanger the availability of your daughter's billet upon her return, Ishall have to obtain her 'Brighton mother's', consent and agreement to have her back, before I can give her permission to go away. Christmas, your contribution As at to the Government billeting allowance must be paid as usual, while she is away. I was very grateful for parents' co-operation over the Christmas holidays, and I am sure you will again see that your daughter returns to us at the right time. I think you will like to know that, in spite of the very severe weather, the school is doing a good term's work, and that we have not had much illness amongst the children. Sogned D Y Chetham Strode.” Turning this sheet over is a letter written from the evacuee Sheila to her “mummy and daddy” from the address of “8 Havelock Road, Brighton 6 Sussex” this handwritten letter states: “Dear mummy & Daddy, Thankyou very much letter. I am very sorry you will not be able to come down and I hope mum gets better to you will be able to com down. Could you mastories hat down if it is finished mollie my friend, till, Barbara a I are going to the pictures tonight. It seems funny aunt Em & you getting measles nearly at the same time but girl in our school has had them. By the way Babs and I are now broke. Can I go home to Grammies at Easter? I am going to make something towards 2 Foocks + chess. In the school are having as you know new hat bands + blazer badge, 2 1- each they will be in stock soon. We are going to church tomorrow. I do hope you will be better soon + come down to see us. My shoes need mending, shall I pay for them out of the necessary money (blue pencil) { small sketch of Adolf, which is labelled Old Hasty) love from Sheila (ps I think my writing is better). Xxxx” 
 
The next document titled “the royal foundation of the grey coat hospital Westminster report for the spring term 1940” to Sheila Fenn, late twice, 0 absences, aged 13.9 years average grade B+. Virtually all the same grades as the first report sheet.
 
The next document is title “London county council education officers department to the parents of all London secondary school pupils” this letter states: “Although so far there have been no land air raids on this country, the risk of such raids is as great as ever. The Government is therefore still strongly of opinion that school children should be dispersed anxious that all pupils who are now away from London should remain where they are. The in what are known as the reception areas. Council is also very anxious to move from London any children whose parents now wish them to rejoin their schools. This view is fully shared by the Council, and it is most many of these pupils have been registered, and the Government has been pressed to find billets for them. When the necessary billets have been found the Council will make arrangements to transfer the children so that they may be united with their own schools.” It must be remembered that all the headmasters and headmistresses, and practically all the staff, of the London secondary schools-aided and maintained-are in the reception areas. school pupils are also there, and these pupils have the great advantage of being able to continue under their own teachers the secondary school courses they began before the war. A majority of the secondary. Unfortunately there remain in London at the present time a number of secondary school pupils whose parents, apparently, do not wish them to be moved. The Council has carefully considered what steps can be taken to meet, as far as possible, their educational needs, and it has decided to open in London on a half time double-shift basis twelve emergency secondary schools, six for boys and six for girls, in the secondary school buildings at the addresses given on the back of this sheet. These emergency schools will be open to any secondary school pupils in the district, and will not be in any sense branches of the schools normally using the premises. If necessary a limited number of tutorial classes may be organised in some of the remaining secondary school buildings. For the present it is possible to provide education only for half-time. Fee-paying pupils attending the emergency secondary schools or approved secondary school tutorial classes will be required to pay the same fee as that of the secondary school they would ordinarily have attended. Holders of scholarships or special places attending these schools and classes will receive the maintenance grants or pay the fees, if any, assessed under the terms of the award. All pupils who desire to attend the emergency schools should enrol on Monday, 18th, Tuesday, 19th, or Wednesday, 20th March, at the emergency secondary school nearest to their addresses. Pupils who live a long distance away from any emergency secondary school and who wish to attend secondary school tutorial classes should enrol at the nearest Council divisional office on or after Monday, 18th March. The addresses of the divisional offices are set out on the back of this sheet. Except in very special circumstances, admission to the schools and classes will be permitted only at the beginning of a term. The summer term will begin on Tuesday, 9th April, 1940. In conclusion, the Council wishes parents clearly to understand that, in its opinion, it would be most undesirable and unwise for any parents to bring their children back to London on account of the educational facilities which are about to be provided in London, or for any other reason. As the Prime Minister and other Cabinet Ministers have frequently stated, the case for evacuation is just as strong now as it was in September last. Indeed, the Government has gone to considerable trouble to prepare a further scheme of evacuation to be operated after serious land air raids have taken place. It is obvious that such evacuation arrangements would have to be carried out under very difficult and possibly dangerous conditions. Under such conditions it would be impossible to guarantee that secondary school pupils would be able to reach their own or any other secondary school. It will be seen, therefore, how very important it is (i) that parents should not bring their children back to London, (ii) that parents of any secondary school children now in London should endeavour to move their children to their own secondary schools in the reception areas. Parents are urged to accept this advice, for by doing so, not only will they be acting in the interests of their children's safety but they will also be giving them the best possible chance of continuing their secondary education without interruption and they will at the same time be assisting materially in the defence of London. The County Hall. Westminster bridge SE1 March 1940”. On the reverse of this letter is the addresses of London emergency secondary schools north and south of the Thames with their full names and addresses.
 
The next small letter states “GREY COAT HOSPITAL at: Varndean School for Girls, Brighton, 6. Dear Mrs.Fenn, March 1940. As Thank you for your letter about the Easter holidays. Sheila's 'Brighton mother' is willing to keep her billet open, I am prepared to give her leave of absence from March 21 esp To april 10th. Yours very truly, D.7. Chethan- Strode.”
 
Another double sided letter, with a hand written postage label to Mrs Fenn 62 Cornhill London Ec3, postage stamp 132, titled from mill bank school at hertford Road school Brighton 6 April 30th 1940, dear parent: “Dear Parent, before the postage charges go up we thought we would seize this chance of sending you a little more news of our party down here. The weather has now definitely taken a turn for the better and this is making a big difference to our activities. Until recently the downs were bleak and too cold for us to use much but now we are out at games most days and parties can be found rambling all over the hills after nature specimens or with maps and sketch books in their hands. afield have already started and boys and girls returned from Journeys further the Devil's Dyke last week with posies of primroses and other wild flowers. The allotment is now well in hand, It has all been thoroughly trenched and most of it is under crops which are already to be seen coming through the ground in orderly ranks. Swimming is commencing too and your child, if old enough, would like his costume if he has not already got it. We are looking forward to these next few months to bring to your children many experiences which they could not have at home and thus to make the most of our enforced exile. One thing which is very pleasing is the small amount of illness that we have had during the winter, We feel now that the worst weather is past that we can really say that we have been most fortunate. There have been some cases of German measles but nothing like an epidemic and little beyond that. That shows how fit everyone is and the sunshine and fresh air that we are getting so much of now should make everyone even fitter. But as a preventative we are pleased to say that our Medical Inspections have started again and your child will be thoroughly inspected during the next few weeks. We hope that now the weather is improving the clothing problem will be easier. In some cases in the past we have been able to help with children's clothing but please bear in mind that this is not at all easy for us to do. We are only able to do a little and in the most desperate cases and, although we are always willing to do all we can, we do ask you to do all you can too. Although Mr Jakes, who started the shoe repairing classes, has now been recalled to London, we are still carrying on and Mr Mackenzie is turning out both repaired boots and boot repairers rapidly. To those who are still waiting to hear how their children have done in the Scholarship examinations we would say that we do not yet know how soon those results will be available but thay shall be notified as soon as we hear them. If you have any problems or difficulties letters will be dealt with as soon as received or you can make an appointment if you are coming down at the week-end. In emergency, call at 404, Ditchling Road any week-end and this applies to Whitsun week-end including Whit Monday. Once more assuring you that we are doing all we can to make your children happy and to keep them fit, Yours sincerely, E. Robertson, 0. Dent, J.B.Dempster.” On the back of this letter is a P.S note from the teachers stating “P.S. Another difficulty which the increased postage presents is the weekly letter home which each of your children writes. It is hoped that most parents will still send a stamp each week so that the letter can be sent direct to them but, in future, all letters for Westminster parents for which there are no stamps will be sent each Wednesday to Mr Brown the caretaker at Millbank School and then parents can call for them there on the Thursday. Of course this will only help parents living in Westminster and we hope that all those who can do so will still send stamps and have their letters direct. The Central Meeting place for Parents visiting Brighton on Sundays has been so poorly used during the last few weeks that it has had to be closed down. It will be re-opened during the Autumn if it seems necessary.”
 
The next letter dated 6th June 1940 title London county council, dear Sheila Fenn 1938 Special places Migration , states: “I have to inform you that, in consequence of a re assessment of income, the value of the award held by the above named pupil has been reviewed. 1940 you As from 1st August, 19, the parents are required to pay the governors of the school: - The full school fees. The sum of £55s. fees, whichever is the less. a year, or the full school Payment must be made terminally, in accordance with the school rules. Yours faithfully, E. M. RICH, Education Officer”. 
 
Following this are two undated documents for Sir John Cass’s foundation school about documents, these two documents are trying to sell the school to the parents. This school is intended for Sheila for after she completes her time at the Great coats hospital.
 
This is an incredibly rare insight into a 12-13 year old girls London evacuees & Her parents experiences and hardships as an evacuee from London to Brighton. Especially as extra research showed that her school grey Coat hospital school and her parents home of 62 Cornhill, London EC3V3NH were both bombed during the blitz in 1941, really shows how the government pied piper operation of evacuating children to the country sides was a real success in protecting young people’s lives throughout this wartime period. 
 
This grouping will be dispatched Royal Mail special delivery and dispatched within two working days.